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  • DMOG br We found that long term NSAID use was associated

    2022-05-25


    We found that long-term NSAID use was associated with a shorter LOS. Our findings are consistent with other studies, which suggest that cancer-related pain (usually associated with advanced metastatic dis-ease especially to the bone) increases the likelihood of patient referral for specialist treatments such as radiotherapy [35,38].
    This study has several important limitations which directly relate to the data available in the NIS database. First, the NIS database employs ICD-9 codes, which makes it DMOG impossible to determine the source of the opioid abuse, in addition to the potential for misreporting of opioid use resulting from the variations in code accuracy across hospitals and state. Second, we cannot rule out residual confounding from un-measured covariates such as characteristics of the breast tumor, dura-tion of opioid use and type of opioid. However, we carried out a robust methodological analysis and adjusted for comorbidity indices, previous chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the presence of cancer and non-cancer related pain. In addition, using breast cancer-specific hospitalization, our findings may not be generalizable to patients with other forms of cancer pain. Despite these limitations, the strength of the study lies in the inclusion of a large number of hospitalizations from a large socio-demographic pool, addressing pertinent issues in pain management and
    opioid abuse in an important subpopulation of cancer patients.
    In conclusion, our assessment of the impact of long-term NSAID use on select health outcome indices among women with breast cancer showed that long-term NSAID use was associated with lower opioid abuse, lower inpatient mortality and reduced hospital LOS. In addition to addressing existing knowledge gaps, this study also lends to the limited body of evidence on the role of NSAIDs in the management of cancer pain. We hope this study will contribute to management guidelines as well as policies aimed at addressing the epidemic of opioid abuse in the US.
    Declarations of interest
    The authors declare no conflict of interest.
    Funding
    This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.
    Supplementary materials
    References
    [21] L.B. Ready, C.R. Brown, L.H. Stahlgren, et al., Evaluation of intravenous ketorolac administered by bolus or infusion for treatment of postoperative pain. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study, Anesthesiology 80 (6) (1994) 1277–1286.
    5 Accepted Manuscript
    Association between Nicotine-Dependent Gene Polymorphism and Smoking Cessation in Patients with Lung Cancer
    Fen Gu, Chao Zhao, Tao Jiang, Xuefei Li, Yanjun Mao, Caicun Zhou
    To appear in: Clinical Lung Cancer
    This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain.
    ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT
    Association between Nicotine-Dependent Gene Polymorphism and Smoking Cessation in Patients with Lung Cancer
    Fen Gu1, 3, Chao Zhao1, 3, Tao Jiang1, Xuefei Li1, Yanjun Mao2,4, Caicun Zhou1,4 1 Department of Medical Oncology, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200433, China
    2 Nursing Department, Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200433, China 3 Fen Gu & Chao Zhao contributed equally to the article.
    4 Correspondence to:
    Running title: Nicotine-dependent gene polymorphism in lung cancer